Veel huisdieren van ME-patiŽnten hebben vreemde ziekten die op ME lijken

 

 

 


 

The Human/Animal Interaction in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome:

A Look at 127 Patients

J. of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Vol 6(2) 2000 page 65-72.

R. Tom Glass.

 

 

Objective:

 

To evaluate the interaction between Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) patients and domestic animals (pets).

 

Design:

 

Retrospective study of criteria-met ME/CFS patients using a standardized questionnaire which included patient comments.

 

Setting:

 

University medical center and ME/CFS support groups throughout the United States.

 

Patients:

 

A total of 127 patients met the surveillance criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for the establishment of the diagnosis of ME/ CFS and were included in the study.

 

Measurements:

 

Information from the standardized questionnaire was compiled and appropriate statistical tests, including mean, median, Z test, multivariant analysis, and Chi-square test, were used. This information was compared to national statistical information on animal interaction compiled by the American Veterinary Medicine Association.

 

Results:

 

The most striking result of the study was the association between ME/CFS patients and animals (usually indoor pets) and the number of animals per ME/CFS patient. 97% of the ME/CFS patients had animal contact (expected nationnal contact: 57.9%), with only 2 males and 2 females not reporting animal contact.

 

Reported dog ownership/household for ME/CFS males was 9.5 and for ME/CFS females was 7.9 (expected national average: 1.52). Reported cat ownership/household for ME/CFS males was 6.1 and for ME/CFS females was 8.7 (expected national average: 1.95).

 

106 of the respondents (83.5%) reported that their animals (pets) had atypical diseases with symptoms which mimicked ME/CFS in humans.

 

Of the 106 ME/CFS patients, 100 (94.3%) either were the primary caregiver for the sick animals or had intimate contact (sleeping with, being bitten or scratched by, or kissing the animal).

 

Conclusions:

 

ME/CFS patients have a significant animal interaction and

a large number of these animals have atypical or unusual diseases which at least mimic ME/CFS.

 


 

Abnormal Signs Found in Animals

of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients:

A Look at 463 Animals

J. of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Vol 6(2) 2000 page 73-83.

R. Tom Glass.

 

 

Objective:

 

To evaluate the abnormal signs found in the domestic animals (pets) of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) patients.

 

Design:

 

Retrospective study of the domestic animals (pets) of criteria-met ME/CFS patients using a standardized questionnaire which included patient comments.

 

Setting:

 

University medical center and ME/CFS support groups throughout the United States.

 

Patients:

 

A total of 127 patients met the surveillance criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for the establishment of the diagnosis of ME/ CFS and were included in the study. This group of patients had a total of 463 domestic animals (pets), of which 348 animals demonstrated abnormal signs and 115 were considered healthy.

 

Measurements:

 

Information from the standardized questionnaire was compiled and appropriate statistical tests, including mean, median, Z test, multivariant analysis, and Chi-square test, were used.

 

Results:

 

One hundred six (83%) of the 127 ME/CFS surveyed reported that at least one of their animals (predominantly domestic pets) showed a wide range of unusual or atypical signs, many of which mimicked the signs and symptoms of ME/CFS.

 

The sick animalsí signs were divided into General (40%), Neurological (35%), Gastrointestinal (10%), Reticuloendothelial/Blood (9%), Neoplasia (4%), and Endocrine (2%).

 

One of the most striking result of the study was that 113 of the 127 ME/CFS patients surveyed felt their ME/CFS symptoms were somehow associated with their animals contact.

 

Ninety (71%) of the 127 ME/CFS patients reported that they were the primary caretakers for multiple animals.

 

Other less common findings were:

the onset of ME/CFS being associated with obtaining the animal;

the onset of ME/CFS being associated with a flea bite episode;

prior residents having sick animals and ME/CFS;

other family member contracting ME/CFS from their close association with the sick animal

(as opposed to their association with the family members who had ME/ CFS);

ME/CFS symptoms decreasing after the pet leaving or dying.

 

Conclusions:

 

A large number of animals of ME/CFS patients have atypical or unusual diseases which at least mimic ME/CFS. Most of the 127 ME/CFS patients surveyed have significant animal interactions.